LECTURE PROGRAMME 2019/20 membership year February 18th Paul Jagger Treasures of the Livery Company Halls The City of London is home to no fewer than forty Livery Company Halls, almost as many as existed immediately prior to the Great Fire of London. Many of the Halls succumbed to the fire, others to the Blitz, and several to the property developer, but they all contain a wealth of treasures in art, sculpture, stained glass, silverware and furniture. Collectively the Livery Companies are custodians of an immense array of treasures of national significance including many Royal portraits such as that of HM The Queen during her Golden Jubilee year, commissioned by the Drapers’ Company which with the Sandringham Branch of the Women’s Institute is one of only two organisations of which HM is a member. March 17th Dr Caroline Shenton Packing up the Nation: How heroic Curators & eccentric Custodians saved Britian’s national heritage during the summer of 1939 This is the gripping and sometimes hilarious story of how a band of heroic curators and eccentric custodians saved Britain’s national heritage during our Darkest Hour. As Hitler’s forces gathered on the other side of the Channel to threaten these islands, men and women from London’s national museums, galleries and archives forged extraordinary plans to evacuate their collections to safety. Utilising country houses from Buckinghamshire to Cumbria, tube tunnels, Welsh mines and Wiltshire quarries, a dedicated team of unlikely heroes packed up their greatest treasures in a race against time during the sweltering summer of 1939, dispatching them throughout the country on a series of secret wartime adventures, retold in this talk. Click here for a BBC article on the hidden art treasures during WW2 April 21st Barbara Askew Windsor Castle: from Medieval Fortress to Royal Palace This lecture traces the development of Windsor Castle from an 11th century fortress into a magnificent palace and illustrates how it has been successively enlarged, adapted and rebuilt by monarchs from Henry II to Queen Elizabeth II. Windsor Castle from Morris's County Seats (1880). May 19th Chris Alexander Silk Road: A Textile Journey Wool, cotton and silk have each played a crucial role in the fortunes of Central Asia. Wool created the clothing and housing needed by the great nomadic cultures to dominate Middle Asia. Silk was more valuable than gold and used as currency, creating a network of trading routes that led to the first outbreak of globalisation. Cotton was the cause of Russian and then Soviet Colonisation and continues to cause controversy today. The felts, carpets, embroideries, robes and veils of the Silk Road stratified wealth, displayed religious and political entrenchments and changed the fortunes of this fascinating part of the world; a meeting place between Mohammed and Marx. After the AGM June 16th Richard Thomas Bronzes of Ifa and Benin: And an Historical Review of the Art of Nigeria Africa is not generally associated with great art but Nigeria is associated with 3 major artistic traditions; the 2,000 year old Nok terracottas of the north, the Bronzes of Ife from the C12-C15 and the later Benin Bronzes. Richard lived in Nigeria in the 1960s, near Ife, and became familiar with the art of Ife and Benin and the role they played in society. The art, the technology (using the lost wax process) and the cultural relevance of the Bronzes will be illustrated and discussed in the lecture. Male head, brass, from Udo, Nigeria 16th century Click here to return to the top of the page Web site designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training
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LECTURE PROGRAMME 2019-20 February 18th Paul Jagger Treasures of the Livery Company Halls The City of London is home to no fewer than forty Livery Company Halls, almost as many as existed immediately prior to the Great Fire of London. Many of the Halls succumbed to the fire, others to the Blitz, and several to the property developer, but they all contain a wealth of treasures in art, sculpture, stained glass, silverware and furniture. Collectively the Livery Companies are custodians of an immense array of treasures of national significance including many Royal portraits such as that of HM The Queen during her Golden Jubilee year, commissioned by the Drapers’ Company which with the Sandringham Branch of the Women’s Institute is one of only two organisations of which HM is a member. March 17th Dr Caroline Shenton Packing up the Nation: How heroic Curators & eccentric Custodians saved Britian’s national heritage during the summer of 1939 This is the gripping and sometimes hilarious story of how a band of heroic curators and eccentric custodians saved Britain’s national heritage during our Darkest Hour. As Hitler’s forces gathered on the other side of the Channel to threaten these islands, men and women from London’s national museums, galleries and archives forged extraordinary plans to evacuate their collections to safety. Utilising country houses from Buckinghamshire to Cumbria, tube tunnels, Welsh mines and Wiltshire quarries, a dedicated team of unlikely heroes packed up their greatest treasures in a race against time during the sweltering summer of 1939, dispatching them throughout the country on a series of secret wartime adventures, retold in this talk. Click here for a BBC article on the hidden art treasures during WW2 April 21st Barbara Askew Windsor Castle: from Medieval Fortress to Royal Palace This lecture traces the development of Windsor Castle from an 11th century fortress into a magnificent palace and illustrates how it has been successively enlarged, adapted and rebuilt by monarchs from Henry II to Queen Elizabeth II. Windsor Castle from Morris's County Seats (1880). May 19th Chris Alexander Silk Road: A Textile Journey Wool, cotton and silk have each played a crucial role in the fortunes of Central Asia. Wool created the clothing and housing needed by the great nomadic cultures to dominate Middle Asia. Silk was more valuable than gold and used as currency, creating a network of trading routes that led to the first outbreak of globalisation. Cotton was the cause of Russian and then Soviet Colonisation and continues to cause controversy today. The felts, carpets, embroideries, robes and veils of the Silk Road stratified wealth, displayed religious and political entrenchments and changed the fortunes of this fascinating part of the world; a meeting place between Mohammed and Marx. After the AGM June 16th Richard Thomas Bronzes of Ifa and Benin: And an Historical Review of the Art of Nigeria Africa is not generally associated with great art but Nigeria is associated with 3 major artistic traditions; the 2,000 year old Nok terracottas of the north, the Bronzes of Ife from the C12- C15 and the later Benin Bronzes. Richard lived in Nigeria in the 1960s, near Ife, and became familiar with the art of Ife and Benin and the role they played in society. The art, the technology (using the lost wax process) and the cultural relevance of the Bronzes will be illustrated and discussed in the lecture. Male head, brass, from Udo, Nigeria 16th century
Programme for 2019-20