2018 May 15th DOMINIC RILEY Beautiful British Books (bookbinding) In this lecture Dominic tells the story of fine bindings in Britain over the last hundred years. The journey begins with William Morris and the Kelmscott Chaucer, possibly the last great book of the printed age. He will then show some of the amazing bindings from Sangorski and Sutcliffe, the finest bookbinders in the twentieth century, as well as work from their contemporaries. Dominic will then discuss the new world of Design Binding which emerged after the second world war, as modern design entered this ancient craft, and finish with examples from some of the best artistic bookbinders working today. One of the more elusive copies of the Chaucer is in a jewelled binding by Sangorski & Sutcliffe British Library web site on the Kelmscott Chaucer History of the Kelmscott Chaucer After the AGM June 19th LINDA SMITH Gypsies, Tramps and Thieves: the Representation of the Working Classes in Art This lecture looks at ordinary working people: skilled and unskilled workers in both urban and agricultural environments, craftsmen, artisans, shopkeepers, domestic servants, entertainers, prostitutes, beggars, paupers, slaves. Throughout the history of western art, they have always been there: for centuries as mute observers, background detail or comic relief. But as the world changes, art changes, and this talk will discuss the move of low-life subject matter from the despised and vulgar fringes of popular taste into the respectable mainstream; and out again into political radicalism and avant- garde edginess. This Da Vinci drawing might be "Scaramuccia, king of the gypsies” Grayson Perry talking to the Telegraph about working class art Gypsies in art There are no meetings in July & August Web site designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training
The Arts Society Grantham
Web site and mobile pages designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training
April 17th COLIN DAVIES Architecture, Music and the Invention of Linear Perspective In his dissertation on architecture, Leon Battista Alberti – the  original ‘Renaissance man’ – wrote: ‘We shall therefore borrow all our rules for the fixing of proportions from the musicians’. It is not surprising that the question of proportion should be an important theme in Alberti’s book, but how did the musicians get involved? It turns out that there is a mathematical link between visible proportions and audible proportions, or harmony, and that Renaissance architects were well aware of this link. They saw it as proof that their architecture could participate in the harmony of the whole cosmos. One of them, Filippo Brunelleschi, took the idea further in his invention of ‘linear perspective’ and thereby, incidentally, revolutionised western painting.  Church of Santo Spirito in Florence (1434-82) by Brunelleschi Filippo Brunelleschi’s Linear Perspective Linear Perspective in Painting May 15th DOMINIC RILEY Beautiful British Books (bookbinding) In this lecture Dominic tells the story of fine bindings in Britain over the last hundred years. The journey begins with William Morris and the Kelmscott Chaucer, possibly the last great book of the printed age. He will then show some of the amazing bindings from Sangorski and Sutcliffe, the finest bookbinders in the twentieth century, as well as work from their contemporaries. Dominic will then discuss the new world of Design Binding which emerged after the second world war, as modern design entered this ancient craft, and finish with examples from some of the best artistic bookbinders working today. One of the more elusive copies of the Chaucer is in a jewelled binding by Sangorski & Sutcliffe British Library web site on the Kelmscott Chaucer History of the Kelmscott Chaucer After the AGM June 19th LINDA SMITH Gypsies, Tramps and Thieves: the Representation of the Working Classes in Art This lecture looks at ordinary working people: skilled and unskilled workers in both urban and agricultural environments, craftsmen, artisans, shopkeepers, domestic servants, entertainers, prostitutes, beggars, paupers, slaves. Throughout the history of western art, they have always been there: for centuries as mute observers, background detail or comic relief. But as the world changes, art changes, and this talk will discuss the move of low-life subject matter from the despised and vulgar fringes of popular taste into the respectable mainstream; and out again into political radicalism and avant- garde edginess. Grayson Perry talking to the Telegraph about working class art Gypsies in art There are no meetings in July and August Our new membership year starts in September 2018 Click here to return to the top of the page
Programme for 2018